Good Food on Every Table!

FamilyFarmed is a non-profit organization committed to expanding the production, marketing and distribution of locally grown and responsibly produced food, in order to enhance the social, economic, and environmental health of our communities.

EXPO Exhibitor Marketing Toolkit

Thank you for partnering with FamilyFarmed on important farmer training workshops. Please see below for copies of our logos, photos and promotional text for use in advertising your workshop.

Farmer Training Banner

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Direct Market Success manual cover

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Wholesale Success manual cover
2015 WS cover
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Photo of FamilyFarmed Farmer trainer Atina Diffley
Atina Diffley
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Our trainer, Atina Diffley, is an organic farmer and author of the 2012 award wining memoir, Turn Here Sweetcorn: Organic Farming Works. Atina draws on her decades of experience in vegetable production and marketing to provide operators of produce farms of any size with useful, practical, profit-making guidance on how to achieve the highest quality produce for sale!

Testimonials

What Farmers Are Saying: “Tremendous resource!” “Easily one of the best presentations I have heard on anything anywhere!” “Wonderful! Lots of very useful, actionable information that will help me grow my farm business.” “Atina Diffley did an excellent job! Good presentation from someone who has actually been a grower.”

 

USDA logo with text
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FamilyFarmed logo with text

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FamilyFarmed is a non-profit organization committed to expanding the production, marketing and distribution of locally grown and responsibly produced food, in order to enhance the social, economic, and environmental health of our communities.

 

Documents for Download

 

Workshop Flyer Templates

Wholesale Success Workshop Flyer Template

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On-Farm Food Safety Workshop Flyer Template

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Direct Market Success Workshop Flyer Template

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The following workshop descriptions are provided as examples to help you plan and promote your training.

Meeting The Needs and Values of Wholesale Produce Buyers
Meeting the needs and values of produce buyers is fundamental to creating a healthy long-term relationship. How to actively seek buyers is just the start. Who is your customer and why do they buy? Maintaining the relationship requires attention to details from bunch sizes, labels, and lot codes, contracts, pricing, communication, sequential planting, quality control, trends and more. Learn how to serve the wholesale market and make your farm a highly desired source of fresh produce.

Meeting The Needs and Values of Direct Market Buyers
Meeting the needs and values of your customers is fundamental to creating a healthy long-term relationship. How to actively seek buyers is just the start. Who is your customer and why do they buy? Maintaining the relationship requires attention to details from varieties, quality, pricing, communication, sequential planting, quality control, merchandising,
trends, and more. Learn how to serve the direct market and make your farm a highly desired source of fresh
produce.

Market Strategies That Works for You
Marketing is not a passive process. Market research starts long before the seed is in the ground. Find the right market outlet to match your skills and personality, land, crop mix, and customer’s needs. In this class we’ll discuss trends in the food market and the pros and cons of various marketing models, from roadside stands to farmers markets, csa, agri-tourism, restaurants, pick-your-own, on-line sales, and wholesale to retail and brokers. We will work in class on designing a mix of markets and crops that work for your farm and market.

Farm Identified Marketing: Tell Your Farm’s Story
One of the most powerful ways you can create stability in your market is through name brand marketing. It isn’t just produce your customers want and need. The opportunity to have a relationship with your farm has a value with a shelf life much longer than fresh food. It also creates goodwill and a committed customer who will support you when disasters hits. To build a committed relationship with your customers learn to tell a compelling story about yourself, your farm, and your products.

Sorting and Packing For Wholesale Markets
Wholesale buyers selling into the retail market expect to receive high quality produce packed to USDA industry standards. Come learn about packing standards: size, shape, and uniformity, grading, proper cartons, liners, and unit packaging, are all crucial components of a well-packed carton. Learn what it takes to keep your wholesale buyer coming back for more and willing to pay a premium for your produce.

Intentional Crop Planning To Meet Market Needs And Maximize Profits
A key component of produce marketing success is timing production to mature for when your market needs it. Successful planning requires skill with sequential planting, crop maturation, and good recordkeeping. Other benefits include maximizing space and fertility, extended harvest windows, maximizing space and farm profits, continuous supply, and optimize quality and yield. Learn how to design a sequential planting/harvest plan, including when to plant, which cultivars, and how to adjust plantings based on weather and markets.

Postharvest Handling
Success for produce farmers requires good postharvest practices to preserve quality and shelf life, and an understanding of postharvest food safety practices to minimize risks. We will discuss the cold chain, respiration, harvest, cleaning, cooling, storage, transportation, and sanitation for maximum shelf life. Food Safety will be discussed from a risk-prevention perspective, integrated into post harvest, and be FDA Produce Rule relevant. This workshop will include examples and discussion of cost-effective and scale appropriate postharvest systems and short videos from working farms for group discussion.

Designing Your Packing Shed
A well-designed packing shed is a crucial component of an efficient farming operation. The value of high-quality produce can be lost quickly if it isn’t cleaned, cooled and moved into cold storage in a quick, safe, and efficient manner. And good postharvest facilities can dramatically improve speed, efficiency, health, safety, and employee morale. In this session we will discuss packing shed designs and product flow, and work on designing or redesigning participant’s sheds.

Produce Farmers Are Food Handlers! Let’s do it profitably How we handle our product affects the post harvest quality and safety of our food, and our relationships with buyers. Integrating food safety systems into postharvest practices and market relationships supports the development of farm systems that are viable, cost-effective, and scale appropriate. Every farm is different and buyers in all markets are increasingly expecting farmers to be proactive about the safety of the produce they sell. This training is hands-on and designed for active learning. We will do risk assessments in the classroom to identify potential hazards, analyze how they move on our farms, and determine if we need to take action or not. We will also develop record keeping/traceability systems that align with the farm work, support decision-making, and maximize profitability while also meeting food safety requirements. Class participants receive a free 3-ring binder food safety plan template.

Intro to Food Safety

If you grow produce and sell it, you are a food handler and are responsible for the “wellness” of your product. Food safety needs to be understood and implemented by every farmer, no matter what size, but it’s not a onesize- fits-all. This workshop is designed for small to midscale produce growers.This training course may satisfy staff training requirements as described in the FSMA Produce Safety Rule in §§ 112.21(a) and (b). As there is not yet an equivalency evaluation process, it does not currently satisfy supervisor training described in the FSMA Produce Safety Rule 21 CFR Subpart C § 112.22(c).

Food Safety: Jump Start Your Food Safety System With A High Priority Checklist

Food safety is something that every farm, no matter its size or financial position, must attend to. Having a food safety mindset does not necessarily mean having state-of- the-art equipment. This workshop will discuss key areas of food safety and discuss scale appropriate ways to minimize risk and embed safe practices into your daily operations. Start with these high priority practices to jump-start your food safety system. This training course may satisfy staff training requirements as described in the FSMA Produce Safety Rule in §§ 112.21(a) and (b). As there is not yet an equivalency evaluation process, it does not currently satisfy supervisor training described in the FSMA Produce Safety Rule 21 CFR Subpart C § 112.22(c).

Writing a Food Safety Plan
You are a “food handler.” Your customers rely on you to minimize potential food safety risks. Writing a Food Safety Plan specific to your farm operation is a valuable tool to access and develop your food safety system. It will also help you train staff to your expectations and hold them accountable. Atina Diffley will go through the basic components of a food safety plan and take you to online resources to help you write a plan and keep records. This training course may satisfy staff training requirements as described in the FSMA Produce Safety Rule in §§ 112.21(a) and (b). As there is not yet an equivalency evaluation process, it does not currently satisfy supervisor training described in the FSMA Produce Safety Rule 21 CFR Subpart C § 112.22(c).

Weed Management: Bio-Systems And Strategies
Successful weed management in an organic system requires much more than good cultivation. Atina Diffley will discuss weed physiology and management using rotations, seed bed reduction, fertility, stale bedding making, cover crops, habitat for biological life, and tillage equipment, in relation to the agronomic principles of an organic farming system.

Post Harvest Handling and Food Safety
Success for small and mid-sized fresh produce farmers requires good postharvest practices to preserve quality and shelf life, and an understanding of food safety practices to minimize risks. This full-day training will include cost-effective and scale appropriate post harvest handling systems. Food Safety will be discussed from a risk-prevention perspective, integrated into post harvest, and be FDA Produce Rule relevant. This training course may satisfy staff training requirements as described in the FSMA Produce Safety Rule in §§ 112.21(a) and (b). As there is not yet an equivalency evaluation process, it does not currently satisfy supervisor training described in the FSMA Produce Safety Rule 21 CFR Subpart C § 112.22(c).